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Growl

jthenr-comics-vault:

Miles Morales // Ultimate Spider-Man by Dave Marquez Ultimate Comics Spider-Man #28

jthenr-comics-vault:

Miles Morales // Ultimate Spider-Man by Dave Marquez 
Ultimate Comics Spider-Man #28

(via milesjai)

nevver:

Gabriel García Márquez, RIP

nevver:

Gabriel García Márquez, RIP

(via arabellesicardi)

blackmanonthemoon:

Panther Girls Oakland, 1969

blackmanonthemoon:

Panther Girls Oakland, 1969

(via lil-reina)

lynvet:


Gabriel García Márquez (1927 -2014)


Gabriel Garcia Marquez, a Nobel Prize-winning author, journalist, and screenwriter, died Thursday at age 87, according to a report citing a source close to Marquez’s family.
An Associated Press report did not include the cause of death, although Marquez’s family has said in recent days that the author’s health has been “very fragile.” Born in Colombia, Marquez had been recuperating at his Mexico City home after he was hospitalized for nine days due to infections in his lungs and urinary tract. (X)

lynvet:

Gabriel García Márquez (1927 -2014)

Gabriel Garcia Marquez, a Nobel Prize-winning author, journalist, and screenwriter, died Thursday at age 87, according to a report citing a source close to Marquez’s family.

An Associated Press report did not include the cause of death, although Marquez’s family has said in recent days that the author’s health has been “very fragile.” Born in Colombia, Marquez had been recuperating at his Mexico City home after he was hospitalized for nine days due to infections in his lungs and urinary tract. (X)

(via guavasita)

blackcontemporaryart:

January 5th, 2013: In Conversation @ Brooklyn Museum, 8:30 p.m.

Artists Mickalene Thomas and Carrie Mae Weems talk with curator Eugenie Tsai about using their work to challenge conventional ideas of beauty, race, and gender.
Images: Mickalene Thomas, Are You That Someone?, 2010 (Top) Carrie Mae Weems, “Mirror, Mirror” from “Ain’t Jokin’”, 1987–88.  (Bottom)

(via arabellesicardi)

wideonlawnmower:

Eartha Kitt

wideonlawnmower:

Eartha Kitt

(via beatnikdaddio)

dani-misfit-prince-prod:

ladyanastaciaspencer:

Happy 43rd Birthday Selena Quintanilla-Perez {April 16, 1971}

Yas

(via lil-reina)

awwww-cute:

Job interview

awkwardsituationist:

to mark world theatre day, held on march 27, one hundred young syrians from jordan’s zaatari refugee camp acted in an adapted production of king lear. the play — which tells a story of exile, of a ruler losing touch with reality, and of a land divided by rival groups — was directed was nawar bulbul (third photo), a popular syrian actor who fled his country after appearing in anti government protests.

"i wanted to show that these children are not worthless …that they have something real to contribute." he said. “the show is meant to bring back laughter, joy and humanity” and "help [the children] express themselves." the kids — all under the age of fifteen — were actively involved in the costuming, for example.

many of the children cried when they heard the applause of onlookers at the play’s end. said one child, “i do not feel lonely any more in this place.” their parents described the project as a rare point of light in a bleak camp existence. after the show, they boasted of their children’s talent.

the production, months in the planning, was also meant to help counteract the effects of a war that has caused young syrians to miss vital years of education. about 60,000 of the refugees at the zaatari camp are younger than eighteen, and fewer than a quarter regularly attend school. many fear the war is creating a lost generation of children.

photos are by warrick page for the new york times and jared kohler for unhcr. for more on syria’s refugee crisis, see #withsyria, care international, oxfam syria crisis appeal, human care syria and free syrian voices

(it’s interesting to note that shakespeare actually mentions the city of aleppo in mabeth, which serves as a reminder that syria is one of our oldest centers of civilization.)

(via xulaxicana)

Look, without our stories, without the true nature and reality of who we are as People of Color, nothing about fanboy or fangirl culture would make sense. What I mean by that is: if it wasn’t for race, X-Men doesn’t make sense. If it wasn’t for the history of breeding human beings in the New World through chattel slavery, Dune doesn’t make sense. If it wasn’t for the history of colonialism and imperialism, Star Wars doesn’t make sense. If it wasn’t for the extermination of so many Indigenous First Nations, most of what we call science fiction’s contact stories doesn’t make sense. Without us as the secret sauce, none of this works, and it is about time that we understood that we are the Force that holds the Star Wars universe together. We’re the Prime Directive that makes Star Trek possible, yeah. In the Green Lantern Corps, we are the oath. We are all of these things—erased, and yet without us—we are essential.

Junot Díaz, “The Junot Díaz Episode" (18 November 2013) on Fan Bros, a podcast “for geek culture via people of colors” (via kynodontas)

Let em know dad.

(via kenobi-wan-obi)

(via guavasita)

gay8:

Sean MundyUntitled, 2014
"The true terrorists of our world do not meet at the docks at midnight or scream “Allah Akbar” before some violent action. The true terrorists of our world wear 5000 dollar suits and work in the highest positions of finance, government, and business."

gay8:

Sean Mundy
Untitled, 2014

"The true terrorists of our world do not meet at the docks at midnight or scream “Allah Akbar” before some violent action. The true terrorists of our world wear 5000 dollar suits and work in the highest positions of finance, government, and business."

(via so-thisismy-life)

kimkanyekimye:

Kim on the set of a Parisian inspired photo shoot 4/15/14

kimkanyekimye:

Kim on the set of a Parisian inspired photo shoot 4/15/14

(via ytoob)

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